Thursday, April 10, 2014

The Maldives is the extreme test case for climate change action

By Damian Carrington 

Like the azure ocean waters, the challenge of global warming is clear in the archipelago. But can the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's new report crystallise action?

Paradox in paradise: the Maldives economy runs on the natural beauty that development, climate change and other environmental problems threaten. Photograph: Sakis Papadopoulos

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Experimental Climate Monitoring and Prediction for Maldives – April 2014

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Highlights

Seas immediately around Maldives do not show a surface temperature anomaly more than 0.5oC from the seasonal average. While the Rainfall during March over the Northern islands is the highest in the last five last five years, there has been an overall drought when the last six months are considered. Such a drought pattern prevailed in the 6 month period of over the Central islands as well. However, the southern Islands continued to have a wetter than average rainfall over the last season. The predictions from weekly to seasonal scales do not show much departures from climatology.  





Image: Rainfall Anomaly in March 2014. Green areas show above average rainfall and brown areas show below average rainfall. Higher magnitudes are shown in darker shades.






Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Experimental Climate Monitoring and Prediction for Maldives – March 2014

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Highlights

The rainfall over the Northern and Central Island since February 2013 has been up to 35% lower than normal. The rainfall over the Southern Islands were actually about 10-20% higher than normal. The major rainfall deficits commenced in September 2013. The cause of these deficits is not explained by the usual factors such as El Nino.  





Image: Sea Surface Temperature- 12 February 2014






Friday, February 21, 2014

Experimental Climate Monitoring and Prediction for Maldives – February 2014

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Highlights

Dry conditions were observed in Maldives in January. Northern islands did not receive any rainfall during this month while some rainfall was observed in central and Southern islands.  





Image: Sea Surface Temperature- 12 February 2014






Monday, January 13, 2014

Experimental Climate Monitoring and Prediction for Maldives – January 2014

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Highlights

The highest recorded rainfall in the past five years for southern islands was observed in mid-December. This is the third high rainfall event observed this year in this region. Due to this a surplus rainfall was observed in southern Maldives in contrast to the rainfall deficit observed in northern and central islands. The sea surface temperature has become neutral around Maldives but in the rest of the Indian Ocean there is warming to South of the Equator.  





Image: Sea Surface Temperature- 04 December 2013






Friday, December 13, 2013

Experimental Climate Monitoring and Prediction for Maldives – December 2013

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Highlights

Rainfall deficit persists in all of Maldives. The seas around Maldives are warmer than usual, and warm than usual air temperatures are also likely for the three months ahead. ENSO conditions remain neutral and a continuation of neutral conditions is expected through-out the first quarter of 2014. When the whole year is considered, less than average rainfall was observed during 2013 compared to the average of previous 8 years.  





Image: Sea Surface Temperature- 04 December 2013






Monday, November 18, 2013

Experimental Climate Monitoring and Prediction for Maldives – November 2013

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Highlights

The Central Maldivian islands continue to show a rainfall deficit. The seas around Maldives are warmer than usual, and warm than usual air temperatures are also likely for the three months ahead.  





Image: Sea Surface Temperature- 06 Nov 2013